Gear Guide for Kayaking with Whales

Do I bring my own sleeping bag? What about kayak gear, is it all provided? How much should I pack for Orca Camp? Will my camera stay dry when I’m kayaking with whales? These are just some of the questions we field from excited guests as they get ready to join us sea kayaking the coast of Vancouver Island on our 3, 4 and 6-day Orca Camp kayaking with whales adventure. Great questions, all of them; and here, are the answers to those inquiries:

Your Camping and Kayaking Gear are Included

It’s true. When you book your reservation at Orca Camp the only thing you need to pack is your clothing and a keen sense of adventure. Once your reservation is confirmed we will provide you with a detailed packing list so you’ll know what clothing to pack. Once you’re in camp we’ll provide everything else you’ll need to enjoy kayaking with whales off northern Vancouver Island, such as:

2 and 4-person tents with therma rest pads, sleeping bags and liners, full size pillows — all erected on cedar plank platforms tucked into individual nooks of the rainforest:

A secluded tent tucked into the rain forest at the ocean's edge awaits your return after a day of kayaking

A secluded tent tucked into the rain forest at the ocean’s edge awaits your return after a day of kayaking

Your home away from home in the wilderness

Your home away from home in the wilderness

We provide tandem (2-seater) fibreglass kayaks, paddles, spray-skirts, and personal flotation devices. As well, we provide paddling gloves (if you choose to use them), booties to help keep your feet dry while getting in and out of your kayaks, and standard dry-bags to store your personal gear in while out on the water:

Double your pleasure, double your fun? Tandem kayaks make paddling easy, once you get in sync

Double your pleasure, double your fun? Tandem kayaks make paddling easy, once you get in sync

Dad and daughter take a break from paddling the craggy shores of the Johnstone Strait

Dad and daughter take a break from paddling the craggy shores of the Johnstone Strait

But What About my Camera?

There are a couple of ways to protect your camera gear while at the coast, besides bringing a waterproof point-and-shoot camera: 1) store your photo equipment in a dry bag, or 2) protect your gear in a dry box specifically for photography gear. Because every traveller has their own unique camera equipment, we ask our guests to bring their own waterproof protection to use while in camp, but here are three suggestions popular amongst our guests and guides:

These flexible cases are ideal for cell-phone cameras. They let you operate buttons and touchscreens while keeping your equipment enclosed and protected.

E-Case eSeries Case. These flexible cases are ideal for cell-phone cameras. They let you operate buttons and touchscreens while keeping your equipment enclosed and protected.

Great for a point-and-shoot camera with small zoom lens, you can take great pictures while kayaking. On land, the case protects your digital camera from dust and grit.

Aquapac Small Camera Case. Great for a point-and-shoot camera with small zoom lens, you can take great pictures while kayaking. On land, the case protects your digital camera from dust and grit.

A favourite of our guides who spend the summer in Camp is a Pelican Case for keeping cameras easily accessible, yet utterly safe and secure. Because they are fully watertight they are also airtight.

Pelican 1400 Case. A favourite of our guides for keeping their cameras dry, yet easily accessible is a Pelican Case. Because they are fully watertight — they are also airtight, which comes is essential for camera gear spending the whole summer on the water.

We’ve sourced the above products online at  Mountain Equipment Co-op, but you can find them at any outdoor equipment store or most camera shops. The one thing to keep in mind, is that some of the best photos we’ve ever seen taken at camp have been taken in soggy, wet and foggy conditions when the colours of the rainforest pop.

Misty mornings give way to blue sky

Fog hugs the crescent beach at Orca Camp, floating in and out of the trees…making a memorable landscape shot

 

Return to: Main Blog

March 31, 2016